Rising popularity of vaping raises new issues in the workplace

The first time I heard about vaping was during a conversation with my teenage kids a few years ago. I was surprised to hear them say “everyone does it!” What exactly is it? The definition of vaping is “the action or practice of inhaling and exhaling the vapor produced by an electronic cigarette or similar device.” Seems harmless, but is it?

Although smoking has been banned from most workplaces for a long time, vaping now presents new issues for employers as well as society in general. Should this smoking alternative be allowed at work and treated like cigarettes?

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Navigating the rapidly changing landscape of marijuana laws

What if you could jump into your time machine and take a trip anywhere in the United States in the 1970s? Imagine telling an employer that marijuana use would be legalized in the next 40-50 years. Can you picture the disbelief that you would encounter?

Well, that day is here. Starting with California legalizing marijuana for medical use in 1996, today 11 states and Washington, D.C. have legalized recreational marijuana usage and many others allow for its medicinal use with a prescription.

This shift in the legal landscape of marijuana usage has left employers scratching their heads wondering what they should do. Where zero tolerance marijuana policies were common 10 years ago, now employers have to rethink their drug policy when it comes to marijuana use.

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Age diversity: An underemphasized and underappreciated competitive advantage

It seems that our culture focuses diversity attention on the areas of gender, race, and ethnicity. Why don’t we focus on age diversity, too? Workers of all ages have something of value to bring to the workplace.

Having a broad range of employees will give your company the advantage of perspectives that help make your products or services relevant to a broader market.

Consider that in 2016, almost 20 percent of Americans 65 years old and older were working, according to Bloomberg. That’s a higher percentage than ever before in the United States. Some societal factors impact why workers who may have retired at a traditional age continue to work, including increases to the full retirement age for Social Security benefits, loss of traditional pensions and stock market fluctuations that can impact retirement savings for many.

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