Consider impact of daylight-saving time for hourly worker

Many people are familiar with the axiom “spring forward and fall back” to help them remember in which direction to change the clock during daylight-saving time transitions.

However, questions may linger for employers about pay practices for those employees that are “on the clock” during the time change.

Non-exempt employees, who are generally paid on an hourly basis, are entitled to be paid for the hours they actually work. For example, in the fall when employees may only be scheduled for an eight hour shift but end up working nine hours due to the time change, they must be paid for nine hours. In the spring, if a normal work schedule constitutes eight hours, but the employee works only seven hours due to the time change, the employer need only pay seven hours of time worked.

Some companies may decide to pay a full eight hours so that their employees don’t lose regularly expected compensation, but there is no obligation for them to do so.

Employers and scheduling supervisors should not “balance out” time over the year in which an employee works during the time change in the spring and in the fall. Hours should be paid within the time period in which they are worked.

Other questions about compensation or pay practices? Our professional staff at BCN can help. Call us at 800-891-9911 if we can assist you and your business.

 

SueKester_6669
Sue Kester, HR Manager

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